The Mindoro Empowerment Project

Manyang families in the Mindoro region in the Philippines are trapped in ongoing cycles of
absolute poverty.
Help a family break free today with just 30,000 won a month.
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Mother and Child Reading Project

Countless families across the world are marginalised from society due to illiteracy.
Human Asia works to create a brighter world where both mothers and children can learn to read. View more

Digital Literacy

Human Asia advocates digital rights for all so that no one living in the new technology age is left behind. View more

Human Rights-Based Development (HRBD)
Human Asia conducts human-rights based development projects
to spread the light of human rights across Asia and the world.

Together with our advocacy activities, we dream of promoting the concept of human rights on
a wider scaleand improving the lives of marginalised communities in Asia.

Using a Human Rights-Based Approach (HRBA), Human Asia seeks to integrate human rights and development to
realise strong and sustainable development programs. Our programs aim for each individual to live their lives
independently and autonomously. We also strive to promote a more encompassing and effective idea of human rights
by implementing HRBA projects alongside our human rights research and advocacy work.

Human Asia actively cooperates with existing local government programs, international organisations, and other
development cooperation programs to maximise each project’s overall efficiency and sustainability.

We implement our HRBA projects in accordance with the following international standards and goals.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights  ·  The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction
The UN Human Rights Council’s resolution on ‘New and emerging technologies and human rights’ (A/HRC/41/L.14)
Our Development and Cooperation Team carry out a diverse range of HRBA projects:
for human rights development in which the rights of every individual are realised and respected

The Community Empowerment Project (CEP)

  • We support self-reliance and economic stability for communities living in extreme poverty.
  • Our monthly sponsors provide ongoing sustainable support for local families
Main Activities
Mindoro Empowerment Project, the Philippines

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Knowing that my donations are used to help Manyang families learn to read
and children to go to school really makes me feel the light of hope for human rights in our region.
Kang-ho Jhe, Partner at Kim Chang & Lee law firm

HRBD News

2019.05.23 Introducing Human Asia's Children School (2019.05.10) Do you remember the Jumma refugees from Bangladesh, now living here in Korea? Last year on October 5 2018, Human Asia met with some of the Jumma mothers residing in Gimpo. Following that initial meeting, Human Asia has now started a new project with refugee Jumma children in Incheon and Gimpo, ongoing between May and September 2019 with the support of the National Human Rights Commission of Korea. These children are often at the very heart of the socially vulnerable in Korea. The ‘Human Children School’ gives these children the chance to learn about a number of different subjects, and to be inspired by academic experts and volunteers from diverse professions and fields. Through learning about different aspects of society, the school helps the children learn more about their own selves and identities. The school further expects to encourage these children to manifest a positive outlook about their futures. Whilst the school is aimed towards children, their mothers too naturally have an important role within the project. During the planning process for the school which began in February, Human Asia met with the childrens’ mothers to organise the project collaboratively. This joint meeting was an opportunity for all those involved to to brainstorm ways to get the kids actively involved in the school, and concluded with the content and schedule of the school being confirmed. Please support Human Asia in our work to create a society where every child can grow up into a happy and healthy citizen!
2017.03.22 Visiting Badikhel, Nepal and Arunachal India (2017.03.18~21) Channgrok Soh, President of Human Asia, and Somi Kwon, Secretary General, visited the Human Asia Nepal Office in Badikhel.After the earthquake from 2015 April, Human Asia conducted numerous campaigns and fund-raising activities to rebuild the destroyed houses in Badikhel. After looking around the construction sites and the village and donated bags and warm clothes from Patagonia and Neomio. Human Asia also delivered the signboards to the recipients of the rebuilt houses. While visiting Nepal, Human Asia went to a school for Jumma Chakma students in Arunachal Pradesh, India, through the Jumma People's Network Korea, located at Gimpo. Only 2,500 people among 50,000 Jumma residents in Arunachal Pradesh have citizenship, because the local government is relunctant at granting the High Court of India approved papers. They suffer from cases caused by the absence of citizenship; no right to vote, no birth certificates for newborns. From numerous government benefits, right to education is largely denied which led to the establishment of Sneha School for Jumma students. The Jumma people have much enthusiasm for education, and the Sneha School is producing excellent outcomes compared with other regional schools. However, the school is in much need to operate and function, and as the first visiting foreigners to register in Diyun (Arunachal Pradesh), Human Asia is planning to seek measures to support Sneha School in the future.
2011.09.30 "Jum" Library Opening in Kimpo (2011.09.30) Opening "Jum Library" for Jumma people, Bangladeshi minority On Friday September 30th, Human Asia (President: Changrok Soh) and JPNK (The Jumma Peoples Network Korea) held opening ceremony for ‘Jum Library’ at JPNK headquarter located in Kimpo. The ceremony started at 3 p.m. Organizers as well as the following sponsors attended the ceremony: Global health NGO MediPeace (Chairperson: Young-seok Kang); BIR Publishing Co., Ltd. (CEO: Sanghee Park); Kinderland (CEO: Jongwon Lim); Monami Co., Ltd. (CEO: Hakyung Song). The attendance of various civil society members as well as religous leaders made the ceremony all the more meaningful. JPNK President Jagadish Tanchangya introduced the guests and thanked everyone for attending the event. Through his welcoming address, he revealed that: "Jum is a local term in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) of Bangladesh which stands for slash and burn style of shifting cultivation on hill slopes . Jum is a specific term for the land of Jum cultivation with its ripen products namely paddy, cotton, sesame, fruits and different kinds of vegetables. In the old age, the Jumma people used to compare “Jum” to a market place for its variety of agricultural products. Jummas traditionally live on the food products of Jum. In a metaphoric sense, a library is like a “Jum” filled with intellectual products (books) of different kinds of knowledge that we need in everyday life. Hence, “the Jum library” optimistically will influence on building an insight development, progressive and peaceful society in Korea to be represented and replaced by the Jumma generations to come."The opening of Jum Library is a dream come true for all the Jumma peoples-about 70 of them. He thanked all the organizers and sponsors for their active involvement. In his congratulatory remarks, the President of Human Asia Mr. Soh Changrok said:"This is an meaningful event especially in lieu with the fact that this year is the 60th anniversary of 1951 Refugee Convention. The collaboration of different actors-private companies, human rights NGOs and Jumma peoples-for this initiative, made this event all the more meaningful. My deepest and most sincere congratulations." The congratulatory remark was followed by formal official ceremony of commemorating BIR.co. Ltd.'s and Kinderland's delivery of 1,000 volumes to the library. Official tape-cutting ceremony followed.President Kang Byung-seok of the Kimpo Council for Supporting MigrantsI, President Lee Minyoung of Buddhist Solidarity for Reform and President Ahn Hyosang of Korea Socialist Party each delivered a short congratulatory remarks, which concluded the Session 1 of the event. At Session 2, Ronel Chakma Nani the former JPNK Secretary General briefly introduced the organization's activity, also providing explanations about Jumma Peoples and where they came from, etc. After the brieft presentation by Mr. Nani, everyone shared traditional Jumma dishes, enjoying each other's company.Most Koreans are unfamiliar with the term, ‘Jumma’. They are the indigenous people mostly residing in the Chittagong Hill Tracts region of Bangladesh. As ethnic minority, they account for only 0.7% of Bangladesh total population, with 650,000. During the Partition of India in 1947, Indian subcontinent was partitioned on the basis of religion, Pakistan for Muslims and secular India for non-Muslims and Muslims alike. Despite 98.5% of the population of the Chittagong were Jummas and thus non-Muslims, the Pakistani leadership conspired and the Boundary Commission of Great Britain ceded the Chittagon to East Pakistan (now Bangladesh) in violation of the principles of partition and against the wishes of the Jumma people. During Bangladesh’s war of independence with Pakistan in 1971, Jummas sided with Bangladesh’s majority Bengalis. After the independence however, Bangladesh government did not accept Jumma people’s demand for autonomy. Instead, Jumma people are subjected to such human rights violations as land-grabbing, sexual assault, violence and murder, often organized and/or condoned by the Bangladesh government. Escaping from such human rights violations, some of them become refugees in other countries, away from their home.In Kimpo’s Yangchon district specifically, there reside about 60 Jumma people around the JPNK headquarter. 47 of them have already obtained refugee status. JPNK strives to raise awareness on the human rights situations of Chittagong Hill Tracts and Jumma people, seeking solidarity for peace and the promotion of human rights. They maintain close ties with other ethnic minorities residing in Mongolia, Burma, etc. They also advocate for improving human rights of low-income multicultural families. One of JPNK's future projects is Weekend Cultural School , through which children of Jumma community can educate themselves their own languages, Korean as well as other foreign languages; studying of their own culture and Korean's will be also available through the Cultural School. Public lectures on Jumma peoples' human rights anc cultures are being organized as well. Additionally, scholarship funds are being prepared for the Jumma community in Bangladesh. The Jum Library currently holds about 2,000 volumes of Korean language and 500 English languag books. The library will be also used as a place for children to study after school. More donations (books, bookshelves, etc.) are always welcome.
2011.09.30 After Attending the Opening Ceremony of Jum Library (2011.09.30) September 30th, 2011, the opening day of Jum Library will be remembered as a very meaningful day not only for Human Asia (President: Changrok Soh) but also for me, myself. For Human Asia, the opening meant a lot in that it made a contribution to improving human rights for Asians in Korea through a humanitarian campaign, expanding its field of activity from foreign countries which it had focused more. For me personally, it was more fulfilling than any other projects I had worked on as I could give Jumma refugees visible and practical help. The library was able to be open with the help of many. Two publishers, BIR Publishing Co., Ltd. (CEO: Sanghee Park) andKinderland (CEO: Jongwon Lim), gladly donated one thousand books respectively when they learned that the Jumma refugee children in Korea could not study and read many books under the difficult circumstances. Monami Co., Ltd. (CEO: Hakyung Song), a stationery company, generously offered stationery supplies for the children and MediPeace (Chairperson: Youngseok Kang), global health NGO, had The Jumma Peoples’ Network Korea (JPNK) office wallpapered for free, making the library much more beautiful. The opening ceremony of Jum Library, which held at JPNKlocated in Kimpo on Friday September 30th, had more significantmeaning as not only the organizers and sponsors but also people from various communities and civic groups were present. Most Koreans are unfamiliar with the term, ‘Jumma’. They are the indigenous peoples mostly residing in the Chittagong Hill Tracts region of Bangladesh. As ethnic minority, they account for only 0.7% of Bangladesh total population, with 650,000. During the Partition of India in 1947, Indian subcontinent was partitioned on the basis of religion, Pakistan for Muslims and secular India for non-Muslims and Muslims alike. Despite 98.5% of the population of the Chittagong were Jummas and thus non-Muslims, the Pakistani leadership conspired and the Boundary Commission of Great Britain ceded the Chittagon to East Pakistan (now Bangladesh) in violation of the principles of partition and against the wishes of the Jumma peoples. During Bangladesh’s war of independence with Pakistan in 1971, Jummas sided with Bangladesh’s majority Bengalis. After the independence however, Bangladesh government did not accept Jumma people’s demand for autonomy. Instead, Jumma people are subjected to such human rights violations as land-grabbing, sexual assault, violence and murder, often organized and/or condoned by the Bangladesh government. Escaping from such human rights violations, some of them become refugees in other countries, away from their home. In Kimpo’s Yangchon district specifically, there reside about 60 Jumma people around the JPNK headquarter. 47 of them have already obtained refugee status. JPNK strives to raise awareness on the human rights situations of Chittagong Hill Tracts and Jumma people, seeking solidarity for peace and the promotion of human rights. They maintain close ties with other ethnic minorities residing in Mongolia, Burma, etc. They also advocate for improving human rights of low-income multicultural families. Through his address of thanks, JPNK President Jagadish Tanchangya explained that "Jum", the name of the library, was a local term used in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) of Bangladesh. He said that for Jumma people who grew rice, cotton, sesame, fruits and vegetables "Jum" was an farming method and an important means of living. And in that sense "Jum Library" was a knowledge supplier which provided Jummaswith intellectual produce that they needed every day, he added. He sent his gratitude to all the parties concerned with the library, saying that the library was a dream come true for around seventy Jummas living in Korea. I felt more affinity when I learned the meaning of the word "Jum." After the book donation and ribbon cutting, everybody came together by sharing traditional Jumma dishes and celebrating the library opening. I felt so great when I looked at the children with big smiles and about two thousandvolumes of Korean and five hundred English books. As I thought that the library would be used as an after-school study room for Jumma children and a resting place filled with knowledge for Jumma people, I was once again reminded that our job, working together to look around the marginalized people in our society and making as many of them as happy, was very much valuable. As a member of Human Asia, I want to continue to pay attention to Asian people with compromised human rights and take the lead to improve them even a little.Ahreum KimProgram Manager of Human Asia

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