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Hurasia & Newsletter
Bringing you the latest updates on regional
human rights issues and development
Our newsletter is published in English and Korean on an alternate monthly basis.
We send our Hurasia regional updates in the first and third week of each month (Korean only).
  • Newletter
  • 2020.08.31

[Human Asia Newsletter] August 2020

August 2020/No.122 Human Asia newsletter is delivered both in Korean and English. If you wish to receive 'English newsletter' only, click here and modify your subscription settings. Download the e-newsletter for mobile devices Latest Activity Updates [5 August, 2020] EAYAN Program Online Event - Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) & Gender Equality: Creating Synergies and Cooperation between the EU and East Asia On Wednesday 5 August, Human Asia hosted our first virtual event for members of the 2020 East Asia Young Activists Networking (EAYAN) Program. Our final members for the 2020 EAYAN Program were selected in February, and originally were to meet at Human Asia’s EAYAN Program ten-day workshop in April 2020. However, due to the spread of COVID-19, the workshop unfortunately has been postponed for 2021. This online event therefore represented the members’ first opportunity to greet their fellow participants from South Korea, Japan, Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Read here [15 August, 2020] The 8th Global Human Rights School - The Jangmadang Generation: Young People & Human Rights in North Korea On Saturday 15 August, Human Asia hosted the 8th Global Human Rights School under the theme of ‘The Jangmadang Generation: Young People & Human Rights in North Korea’. The guest speaker for this year’s event was Sokeel Park, South Korea Country Director at Liberty in North Korea (LiNK). Due to the spread of COVID-19, this year the school was held online via Zoom. Read here 20 August, 2020 - Final Research Report Session with UAEM Korea On Thursday 20 August, Human Asia hosted the Final Research Report Review session with UAEM Korea and our Expert Advisory Committee. Due to the spread of COVID-19, the final session was hosted online via Zoom. This year’s Advisory Committee consisted of: Professor Hye-young Kwon (Mokwon University), Professor Sylvia Park (Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs), Dr. Unni Karunakara (Yonsei University, Yale School of Public Health), and Director Seung-beom Hong (ISU Abxis). Read here BOOK Title: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa Author: Dambisa Moyo “What if, one by one, African countries each received a phone call… telling them that in exactly five years the aid taps would be shut off- permanently?” This is the question Dambisa Moyo poses to readers through the book Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa. In the last 50 years, 400 billion dollars has been sent to aid in Africa. The expectation of individual donors as well as Western nations that have funded this aid is that such aid would lead to significant improvements in the quality of life for people in Africa. Surprisingly, Dambisa Moyo provides structural reasons why aid worsens the quality of life. Aid creates more civil conflict as groups fight over governance in order to take control of the large sums of aid, aid causes inflation and makes the products of developing nations less competitive in the international market, and aid decreases the independency of African politicians to generate policies that truly benefit their country as donors and Western politicians dominate the discussion of African policy making. Dead Aid continuously challenges the pre-existing beliefs that readers have regarding the benefits of aid. Rather than aid, Dead Aid suggests an alternative solution based on entering the bond market and embracing foreign direct investment. Due to increasing interests of investors in emerging countries as well as more information and globalization, the chances of developing nations receiving investment through the bond market is increasing. Furthermore, despite lack of infrastructure and corruption, there has been a recent surge of Chinese capital in Africa. While a significant portion of Chinese capital is focused on resource rich mining sectors, investment is also influencing other sectors such as telecommunications and tourism. Western nations can assist this process of transition through lessening protectionist regulations on agricultural products, allowing African nations to export agricultural products to the West. Dead Aid is a book for people interested in international development and humanitarian aid. It provides insight into diverse kinds of aid that exists, criticizing certain types of aid that have contributed to exacerbating poverty in Africa. While the author realizes that aid cannot stop instantaneously, Dambisa Moyo argues that aid should gradually stop in order for African nations to gain more independence and stability. * Written by Gaeun Park MOVIE Title: Mabo Director: Rachel Perkins Terra nullius is a Latin expression meaning “nobody’s land”. This term was sometimes referred to in international law to justify claims that certain territory may be acquired by a state’s occupation of it. Several territories have been claimed to be terra nullius, especially by states who underwent European settlement during the colonization era. In a minority of those claims, international and domestic courts have ruled against the terra nullius claims. The film Mabo provides insight on the Mabo case in 1992, a momentous decision which decided in favor of native title in Australia and was a pivotal moment in the history of indigenous land rights in Australia. Aboriginal Australians inhabited Australia for over 65,000 years before the European settlement commenced in 1788. However, since indigenous customs, rituals, and laws were unwritten then, Australia at the time was considered terra nullius at the time of settlement. The controversial case known as the Gove land rights case in 1971 ruled that by the law before the time of European settlement, Australia was considered “desert and uncultivated” and therefore there was no such thing as native title in Australian law. However, with diverse efforts through legal cases in 1877, 1979, and 1982, numerous Aboriginal activists challenged Australian sovereignty on the grounds that terra nullius had been improperly applied, thereby arguing Aboriginal sovereignty to be intact. The TV film Mabo sheds light on the Mabo v Queensland case in 1992, which began from the efforts of Eddie Mabo and four other Torres Strait Islanders to establish their traditional land ownership. Eventually, the High Court of Australia found that the Torres Strait Islanders owned their land prior to annexation by Queensland, ruling against Queensland Supreme Court’s terra nullius claims. The ruling thus had far-reaching significance for the land claims of both Torres Strait Islanders and other Aboriginal Australians. The 1992 Mabo v Queensland case caused controversy in many other states that underwent European settlement in the past, who now had to bring administrative measures to clarify their indigenous populations’ rights. Mabo highlights the long endeavors of the Aboriginal population to proclaim their territorial rights and shows the future path yielded with their sacrifice. This film thus helps us investigate our society’s current attitude towards the issue of indigenous rights in other parts of the world. Unfortunately, there are still several states out there that have legally proclaimed indigenous territory rights for the moment yet have not put into practice. Having no means to claim their traditional territory, indigenous populations such as the Mangyan people in the Philippines are suffering in absolute poverty with very limited economic activities. We must not forget that indigenous peoples are equally rights holders who deserve the minimum provision of sovereignty and fundamental facilities to enjoy. This could provide us a step towards understanding indigenous sovereignty and rights to be claimed in different states around the world. * Written by Seungcheol Lee UPCOMING EVENTS · 2 September, Human Rights Special Lecture for Ajou Middle School · 7 September, 2020 4th Human Rights English Essay Competition - Top 10 Essays Announced · 23 September, 2020 4th Human Rights English Essay Competition - Top 3 Essays Announced · 31 September, 2020 Youth Human Rights Clubs Application Due · (TBD) 2020 4th Human Rights English Essay Competition Presentation Ceremony

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  • Newletter
  • 2020.06.26

[Human Asia Newsletter] June 2020

Human Asia Newsletter June 2020 No.113 ​  See our latest Activity Updates _____________________________________  Introducing Human Asia YOUTH Introducing Human Asia's Interns! World Refugee Day  Social Minority Rights _____________________________________  [Social Minority Rights] The Jumma People of Bangladesh 001 (Click)  BOOK REVIEW _____________________________________ The Bluest Eye - Toni Morrison Toni Morrison’s first debut novel The Bluest Eye is a story of an African-American girl called Pecola Breedlove, who grows up in a segregated America and undergoes a series of tragic events that eventually devastate her. Pecola is raped by her own father and molested. Situated in a society that appraises conventional American standards of beauty, namely, blue eyes, white skin, and blond hair, Pecola desires to have blue eyes in order to be loved and accepted by others. Her extreme obsession with blue eyes eventually drives her insane and forces her to believe that she has blue eyes by the end of the novel. Throughout the novel, Morrison epitomizes the situation of African-American young women in the 1940s who were exposed to internalized racism and sexism. The novel was published when the Black Arts movement and the Women’s Liberation Movement (late 1960s ~ early 1970s) was starting to flourish. Morrison not only reveals what racial oppression and widespread racism, enforced by laws such as Jim Crow, can do to the most susceptible members of society, but also distinctly depicts the mistreatment and sexual victimization of young African American women. Along with demonstrating how internalized racism can alter the lives of young African-American women in subtle yet tremendous ways by perverting the standards of beauty and happiness, Morrison also illustrates the experience of sexual vulnerability of young African American women at that time. The most outright case in the novel is Cholly Breedlove’s rape of his own daughter Pecola. Being the victim of sexual assaults from white men during his childhood years, he becomes the rapist of his own daughter, who is restricted by her “[race], youth and sex”. Cholly’s act along with Pecola’s response to it points to the humiliation that many African American women endured and continually resisted in society. Morrison also brings out the issue of subjection of women that many young African American girls confronted. For instance, an African American middle-class housewife Geraldine believes that women must be lady-like and learn “how to do the white man’s work with refinement: home economics to prepare his food; teach education to instruct black children in obedience; music to soothe the weary master and entertain his blunted soul”. By acting submissively and passively to men, Geraldine prioritizes her reputation in the society instead of being active and self-confident. Pecola, her father and Geraldine, end up reproducing the ‘white example’ by being continually subjected to the hostility of the white American community, thus depriving them of their own identity and conscience. Morrison incorporates sensitive issues, namely, internalized racism, sexual vulnerability, and subjection of women that many African American women have been exposed to in The Bluest Eye. Throughout the novel, many young African American women are impaired both physically and psychologically and are constantly being oppressed by the ideal representation of Femininity. These issues still continue to persist in our modern society and pose threats to many vulnerable members of our society. Written by Jeeeon Lee FILM REVIEW _____________________________________ Ma vie en rose (My Life in Pink (2012) - Directed by Alain Berliner "God sends Xs and Ys. XX for a girl, XY for a boy. Okay? My X for a girl fell in the trash. I got a Y instead. A scientific error!” “I am a girlboy,” Ludovic says as he contemplates his 7-year-old life so far growing up Belgian suburbs. Dressed in pink skirts with flowers in his hair, Ludovic is convinced that there was a mistake when he was born – he was supposed to be a girl instead of a boy. As Ludo increasingly shows affection for Jerome, his neighbour and son of his father’s boss, his whole community and family deny his transsexuality and attempt to “cure” his dreams of marrying another boy.Combining childish innocence with the heartbreaking, overbearing standards of adult society, the film depicts the challenges transgender individuals face as they express their identities to strangers and people as close to them as family. The film does not send out an open message or a political agenda in support of LGBTQ communities, but rather keeps its focus on the perspective and raw experience of a child. Jumping back and forth between Ludovic’s imaginary “pink world” where he talks to his favorite TV character Pam and the real world that attempts to turn him away, the film provides a contrasting image between child and adult, dream and reality, and acceptance and dismissal.Although the 1997 film is classified as comedy and has mild sexual, violent, or linguistic content, the movie received an R rating by the Motion Picture Association of America. However, at the same time the film also received the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film, exemplifying the very duality between approval and disproval of gender identities that the film portrayed through its narrative. In celebration of Pride Month, viewers will have much to take away from Ma vie en rose and young Ludovic’s story that continues to hold relevance today. Written by Yejin Son UPCOMING EVENTS _____________________________________ July 3: Developing An Affordable And Accessible COVID-19 Vaccine: Where We Are Now Webinar. Sign up nowThe 15th Young Human Rights Activists Workshop. Sign up nowThe Mindoro Family Empowerment Project - Become a sponsor today 강남현 강문숙 곽병수 구명진 구자승 구정우 권소미, 김갑유 김고은 김광일 김도형 김동혁 김민지 김수영 김영자 김우영 김자원 김정식 김종엽 김지숙 김태령 김혁(1) 김혁(2) 김현호 김형근 남승현 류성호 류호근 박범진 박정훈 박현준 박형식 박혜란 배명호 백범석 서창우 서창희 손교명 송영훈 송진원 심재경 양기웅 엄영선 오다건 원재천 원준표 유윤정 윤대웅 윤웅상 이다정 이미숙 이선이 이성현 이영환 이용진 이용훈 이은경 이재천 이정국 이철호 임사라 임유철 장근호 정사명 정성윤 정윤재 제강호 조규완 조용노 조윤영 조지영 지연숙 최서린 한지민 허선 황선영 황원희 황유정 황태희 ㈜네오아이씨피, ㈜노아종합상사, ㈜대덕휴비즈, 디자인스튜디오, 르느와르파이브, ㈜부원공업, ㈜사운드파이브코리아, ㈜씨앤에이, 일동제약(주) 및 임직원 일동, 의료법인 오해븐의료재단, 재단법인 정암, ㈜파라다이스, 트리코인베스트먼트(주), 한국외국인학교, EVIP, GLOBAL LEADER, HERS, HS휴라시아, Human Rights-That's Right, KSCFR, Ms. Rights, RTP, SAW, SCCW, 라지인, 보담, 애인, 위드, 유스티티아, 하늘아래같은우리, 하나 휴라시아

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  • Hurasia
  • 2020.06.11

Hurasia is currently only available only in Korean,

Hurasia is currently available only in Korean. To see our Hurasia regional news updates in Korean, please click here.

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  • Newletter
  • 2020.04.01

[Human Asia Newsletter] April 2020

Human Asia Newsletter April 2020 No.112 ​ BOOK REVIEW _____________________________________ Belleville Au Coeur​ - Christian Page “The greatest danger on the streets is neither cold, hunger, nor alcohol; but rather, human. Thus, it’s necessary to train us to figure out who they really are.” The 283-page prose written by Christian Page describes his life as a homeless person, as well as talks about his feelings and thoughts after he winded up on the streets for 3 years. Petty thieves, drugs, contempt, relationship, violence and disease - the story vividly depicts the harsh reality through the lens of a homeless person, while he does not let go of hopes. The whole story does not entirely consist of despair and frustration. Surely, endless violence against the homeless, contempt and disdain made the life on the streets tough. The homeless are easily targeted of the crime and driven into danger. Among all kinds of danger, the greatest danger is human, but at the same time, somewhat ironically, he underscores that the greatest consolation comes from human being. A few people’s solicitude and warmth, the presence of ‘the Good Samaritan’, would console him. In light of homeless issues, the book poses several questions: is it legitimate to leave the homeless on the streets? What have we ostracized in the society full of extreme hatred and anger? No one was born homeless. The homeless were one part of our society. Are we all entitled to stigmatize and drive them out of the society? I would like to leave some impressive quotes from the book: “Justice doesn’t protect the poor. It is current justice that seizes the ankle of the poor and drives them over the edge of the cliff to ostracize them in the society”; “This social abandonment of the homeless denotes that the country that we live in is that much old. We became richer as time changed, but we have faced lack of solidarity as much as our wealth increased. It has become a country of stingy, intolerant, senile old men who fear foreseen death.” Written by Jiwon Park FILM REVIEW _____________________________________ Let Girls Dream - Directed by Shameen Obaid-Chinoy  Despite the outbreak of the COVID-19, a countless number of feminists took on the action this past International Women’s Day. Director Shameen Obaid-Chinoy and Waadi Animations have also made their stance, releasing a Netflix short film Sitara: Let Girls Dream (hereinafter referred to as Sitara). Obaid-Chinoy, a two-time Oscar winner and the first Pakistani director to receive an Academy Award, has bee fighting against brutal violence against women in Pakistan that continues to this day in the name of culture. Obaid-Chinoy’s Sitara is her animated pantomime that sheds light on issues of child marriage in Pakistan. The film begins with two sisters: 14-year-old Pari and 6-year-old Mehr. With their paper airplanes and plane modules, the sisters’ dream as pilots become clear early on in the film. As their father returns home with their brother, Pari receives an ornate slipper from her father which starts an argument between the parents. It is soon understood that Pari is being married off against her will to a man much older than herself. Even though the film ends with the father giving Mehr the paper airplane (hinting that the father may have started to support Mehr’s dream), the expressions on Pari, her mother, and her brother’s face remind us how heartbreaking forced child marriages can be. Sitara delivers such a powerful message without a single spoken word. The absence of dialogue makes the audience concentrate on the subtle changes in the characters’ facial expressions and their detailed body language. Whether it was the director’s intention or not, the emotional impact from such observations seems to be more overpowering than that from spoken words. Obaid-Chinoy described Sitara as a “movement that we want to start across the world”. The movie is already praiseworthy for providing representations to young, passionate Pakistani girls in the animation industry; however, Sitara is more than that. The movie transcends nationality and highlights the cultural obstacle young girls face in achieving their dreams and owning their bodies. The film encourages society to visualize women as autonomous individuals and for families to have constructive conversations about the culture of child marriage. Written by April Park UPCOMING EVENTS _____________________________________ Official Website Revamp RevealMay 4 - The 65th SSK Human Rights Workshop: COVID-19 Pandemic and Human Rights problems at the medical scene (online via ZOOM)May 15 - International Day of Families (UN)May 19 - 2020 5th Conference for Human Rights Leaders of the Next Generation (online via Webex)May 20 - Regular General Meeting (online via zoom)June 30 - Activism Through Art: Unite Against Corona Online Event Human Asia Supporters 강문숙 강민승 곽병수 구명진 구자승 구정우 권소미 권오승 김갑유 김고은 김광일 김도형 김동혁 김민서 김민지 김수영 김영자 김우영 김자원 김종엽 김태령 김혁(1) 김혁(2) 김현호 김형근 류성호 류호근 문대원 박범진 박정훈 박창현 박현준 박혜란 배명호 백범석 서창우 서창희 손교명 송영훈 송진원 심재경 양기웅 엄영선 오원희 오다건 원재천 원준표 유연우 유윤정 윤대웅 윤웅상 이다정 이미숙 이선이 이성원 이성현 이연재 이영환 이용진 이용훈 이은경 이재천이정국 이진영 이진화 이철호 임사라 임유철 장근호 장동진 전명옥 정사명 정성윤 정윤재 조규완 조산새 조수아 조용노 조윤영 조지영 제강호 지연숙 최서린 최치훈 한지민 허 선 황선영 황원희 황유정 황태희 (주)노아종합상사, (주)대덕휴비즈, (주)파라다이스, (주)부원공업, (주)디자인210, 의료법인 오해븐의료재단, 트리코인베스트먼트(주), 재단법인 정암, 고고밴, 일동제약(주) 및 임직원 일동, 한국외국인학교, 디자인스튜디오, 주)네오아이오티, (주)사운드파이브코리아, 고양국제고 보담, 대원 휴라시아, 숭의 휴라시아, 애인, 하나 휴라시아, H.A.S, HATS, Human Acts, Hyehwa Human Asia, K.I.H.A, K.I.S.J, S.A.W, S.C.C.W, Volhumteer, Ms. Rights, 청심휴라시아 Thank you.

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  • Newletter
  • 2020.02.28

[Human Asia Newsletter] February 2020

Human Asia Newsletter February 2020 No.111 ​ BOOK REVIEW _____________________________________ Poetry of Resistance: Voices for Social Justice​ - Francisco X. Alarcón and Odilia Galván Rodriguez Poetry of Resistance: Voices for Social Justice is a collection of poems extracted from a Facebook page, “Poets Responding to SB 1070”. Professor Francisco X. Alarcón created the Facebook page in 2010 to commemorate the nine Latino students who got incarcerated after they chained themselves to the main doors of the Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix in an act of peaceful protest against SB 1070. SB 1070, Arizona’s anti-immigration law, legalized racial profiling against suspected illegal immigrants and encouraged further discrimination against people of color. The Facebook page soon became a place of comfort, resistance, and solidarity for immigrant communities across the United States. This anthology gives us a snippet of the digital activism that prospered on “Poets Responding to SB 1070”. Unlike other works of literature, Poetry of Resistance sheds light on human rights issues through a different medium. This anthology serves neither as an opinion platform or an informative piece. It is a narrative that gives a detailed and personal insight into people’s feelings and struggles. The articulate imagery of nature, of “hummingbirds”, and “butterflies” juxtaposed with the cruel reality of discrimination portrays the confused chaos among the displaced and the targeted communities. Unlike the delicacy of the poet’s words, the poems themselves are resilient and powerful. They demonstrate people’s attempts to appreciate their cultural roots, protect their heritage in times of grievances, and fight for their rights. What makes this anthology remarkable is its balance between individuality and unity. This compilation collects over 100 individual poems that paint heartfelt narratives. The uniqueness of each poem truly adds to the anthology’s richness by effectively illustrating the universality of human rights violations and the society’s need for a comprehensive understanding of the issue. These individual poems, however, are united under a common theme: resistance. The poems write about resistance against SB 1070, police brutality, sexual harassment, deportation, and systematic oppression. This alliance creates a powerful momentum and comfort for the readers who seek solidarity in activism. Written by April Park FILM REVIEW _____________________________________ Capharnaum - Directed by Nadine Labaki The movie Capharnaum reveals the brutal reality of child abuse that is still ongoing in many parts of the world. This is the world where children have no access to education, girls forced to marry old men, and children are abandoned from irresponsible parents. Zain El Hajj, a 12-year-old from the poor neighborhood of Beirut, is the oldest son thus tries his best to protect his brothers and sisters. One day, he realizes his sister Sahar started her period. As soon as his mom finds out, Sahar is “given” to the family landlord, Assad, to get married. Furious with the decision, Zain runs away from home and meets an undocumented migrant worker and fellow street kids. Time passes on living away from home but one day he hears the news that his sister has died due to difficulties with her pregnancy. If that is not horrible enough, his parents announce that they are pregnant again and wants to call the new baby “Sahar”, the name of his dead sister. Disgusted, Zain sues his parents for continuing to give birth to children without any responsibility. This is what he says in court; "I want to make a complaint against my parents. I'd want adults to listen to me. I want adults who can't raise kids not to have any. What will I remember? Violence, insults or beatings, hit with chains, pipes, or a belt? The kindest words I heard were get out son of a whore. Bug off, piece of garbage. Life is a pile of shit. Not worth more than my shoe…...” Nadine Labaki, the director, made Cannes history being the first female Arab filmmaker to win a major prize. Her depiction of the sad lives of children and the cast selection will surely bring tears to your eyes. Why not watch the movie to find out the meaning of ‘Caphanaum’? Written by Minyoung Park UPCOMING EVENTS _____________________________________ Annual Meeting (03/06) (online)Due to the spread of corona virus in South Korea, the following events for March have been postponed.International Women’s Day (TBD)2020 International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (TBD)Community Leaders Spring Workshop (August 2020) Human Asia Supporters 강문숙 강민승 곽병수 구명진 구자승 구정우 권소미 권오승 김갑유 김고은 김광일 김도형 김동혁 김민서 김민지 김수영 김영자 김우영 김자원 김종엽 김태령 김혁(1) 김혁(2) 김현호 김형근 류성호 류호근 문대원 박범진 박정훈 박창현 박현준 박혜란 배명호 백범석 서창우 서창희 손교명 송영훈 송진원 심재경 양기웅 엄영선 오원희 오다건 원재천 원준표 유연우 유윤정 윤대웅 윤웅상 이다정 이미숙 이선이 이성원 이성현 이연재 이영환 이용진 이용훈 이은경 이재천이정국 이진영 이진화 이철호 임사라 임유철 장근호 장동진 전명옥 정사명 정성윤 정윤재 조규완 조산새 조수아 조용노 조윤영 조지영 제강호 지연숙 최서린 최치훈 한지민 허 선 황선영 황원희 황유정 황태희 (주)노아종합상사, (주)대덕휴비즈, (주)파라다이스, (주)부원공업, (주)디자인210, 의료법인 오해븐의료재단, 트리코인베스트먼트(주), 재단법인 정암, 고고밴, 일동제약(주) 및 임직원 일동, 한국외국인학교, 디자인스튜디오, 주)네오아이오티, (주)사운드파이브코리아, 고양국제고 보담, 대원 휴라시아, 숭의 휴라시아, 애인, 하나 휴라시아, H.A.S, HATS, Human Acts, Hyehwa Human Asia, K.I.H.A, K.I.S.J, S.A.W, S.C.C.W, Volhumteer, Ms. Rights, 청심휴라시아 Thank you.

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  • Newletter
  • 2019.12.31

[Human Asia Newsletter] Goodbye 2019, Hello 2020!

December, 2019 No.115I hope you have spent this year with happiness and joy.With your participation and support, Human Asia has been engaging in human rights issues around the world, focusing on Asia. Together, we will make a world where human rights are respected as a natural value making our daily lives freer and more prosperous.We hope to continuously receive your support for Human Asia in the upcoming year and wish you all the best with peace and happiness. Happy New Years! 2019 Human Asia's Promotional Video!Haven't you seen yet? Please click here.????https://youtu.be/x9W96zKU93U Human Asia is supported by your donation and participation.For regular or temporary donationParticipationfor youth and the public Human Asia has a variety of programs, including internships/Model United Nations/human rights school/human rights activists, and diverse campaigns/forums. If you wish to participate in activities of your interest, please check the Human Asia homepage, Facebook, and Instagram for recruitment announcements.*Click on each picture to go to the relevant page.Making a World Where Business and New Technology Do Not Alienate Us.- Human Rights, Business and Technology: An Evolving Agenda (12th Asia Human Rights Forum) (link to data collection) Refugees/Immigrants: Diversity Gathers for a Happier Society Altogether- Opportunities given to refugee families and children to respect themselves and fulfill their dreams with a healthy identity and a broader perspective (Kimpo Human Children's School)- Teenagers who understand refugees as neighbors (Second Global Human Rights School) - Incorporation of imagination to fight against hatred towards refugees (The Fifth Refugee Film Festival)- Studies on the next-generation migration concept and human rights (the 14th workshop of young human rights activists)- Delivery of Neo-Mio donated backpacks (Kimpo Foreign Residents Support Center)Education: Making Sure thatEveryone Receives Quality Education to Dream On- For a better educational environment (India SNEHA School) Towards a World with No Discrimination of Any Kind- a step towards enacting an anti-discrimination law (co-action on the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination)- Donation of Morado Women's Clothing and Neo-Mio Bag to unwed mothers and their children (Korea Unwed Mothers Support Network) Improving Human Rights in North Korea- The opportunity of North Korean defectors to think of ‘the loss’ they have to endure and reflect upon themselves as a political citizen (Writing wrongs from North Korea," a collection of North Korean defectors' memoirs published with the Lafto Human Rights Foundation) Excluding Nobody from Medical Treatment- Campaign for Access to Medicines (with UAEM Korea)For a World That Does Not Discriminate Based On Gender.- Today's Feminism for the Youth (Second 14th Youth Human Rights School)- For the equal rights of the sexual minorities (the 20th Seoul Queer Culture Festival)2020 EAST ASIA YOUNG ACTIVISTS NETWORKING PROGRAM

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  • Newletter
  • 2019.10.31

[Human Asia Newsletter] October 2019

Human Asia Newsletter October 2019 No.110 ​ BOOK REVIEW _____________________________________ Kim Ji Young, Born 1982 - Cho Nam-ju If you are a woman living in South Korea, you will be able to relate to the book “Kim Ji Young, Born 1982.” Reading this made me question if my future will be like the life of the main character, Kim Ji Young. A 34-year-old stay at home mom, wife to 37-year-old Jung Dae Hyun, mother of three year old Jung Je Won, she has lived her life accepting discriminations against woman as something natural. One day she takes a walk with her daughter in a stroller and decides to drink a two-dollar coffee. As she is enjoying her coffee, she hears someone say “I can’t believe these housewives will waste money on coffee when their husband is working hard. They’re “momchoong*”” Jiyoung has given up her life, her dream, her job, and went through severe pain to have a baby. She was already depressed enough that her life changed completely after giving birth but was now even called an “insect.” After this day, she starts having psychiatric disorder. This book introduces unjust situations she went through from being a child to the present. For example, she was never loved by her grandmother because she was a girl. Her brother received all the love. Her father always scolded her for hanging out late at night when she is a girl. Her female colleagues were victims/potential victims of hidden cameras installed in toilets. The book reflects my life of being a female as well. That’s why I was able to relate to Jiyoung and understand her situation. I would like to give a few comments to those who are planning to read this book. Please do not draw the conclusion “women suffer more than men” or “men suffer too!” separating two sexes apart. This book does not send the message that only female go through hard problems in the society. I hope everyone can just take this book as an opportunity to understand and realize the situation females in South Korea go through. Recently the movie based on the book has been released. Before we hit the theaters or after, why not read the book? *momchoong – momchoong is a word used in the South Korean society. It means mom as in mother and choong as in insect. It is used to call upon moms who are excessive, self-centered, and has no thoughts except for herself and her child. FILM REVIEW _____________________________________ Green Book - Directed by Peter Farrelly The movie takes place in the 1960s in the United States. Tony Vallelonga who believes in the art of fist fighting seeks for a job and is interviewed as a chauffeur by Dr. Don Shirley, black pianist. Tony is hired and becomes Don Shirley’s bodyguard and chauffeur going on an 8-week concert tour. Regardless of their difference in opinions, behavior, accents, and skin color, the two build a strong friendship. The 1960s was a time of intense racial discrimination against African Americans. Even though slavery was abolished in 1863 by Lincoln’s Declaration of the Emancipation Proclamation, black people were discriminated against by white people until the 1960s. Especially in the southern part of the US where the movie is based on, there was even a “black and white separation law.” By law, black people were not allowed to sit in the front seat of the bus and children were not allowed to attend white children’s schools either. The film characterizes Dr. Don Shirley as an elegant, cultured, neat, and independent figure to describe racism. I was able to depict the severe problem of racism at the time as the film incorporated scenes such as Dr. Don Shirley being rejected to buy clothes in a boutique or banned from entering a restaurant. Furthermore, the movie made me realize how ignorant and indifferent the society has been towards the discrimination minorities received through the character Tony. Tony also starts off as a racist character but later turns into someone who actively fights against prejudice and discrimination working with Don Shirley. His anger towards the unjust situations of being refused to restaurants allow the audiences to express their anger with him. The “Green Book” as the title shows was a guidebook that marks accommodations and restaurants black people are not allowed to enter. This was widely used by black drivers and travelers. It is a tragedy that even travel guides were used differently depending on the skin color. This film is unique as it depicts discrimination that happens in daily lives. This movie won the best picture award at the 2019 Academy Awards, won three awards for best screenplay and best supporting actor awards. UPCOMING EVENTS _____________________________________ Human Asia Executive Committee Meeting (11/05) Human Asia Supporters 강문숙 강민승 곽병수 구명진 구자승 구정우 권소미 권오승 김갑유 김고은 김광일 김도형 김동혁 김민서 김민지 김수영 김영자 김우영 김자원 김종엽 김태령 김혁(1) 김혁(2) 김현호 김형근 류성호 류호근 문대원 박범진 박정훈 박창현 박현준 박혜란 배명호 백범석 서창우 서창희 손교명 송영훈 송진원 심재경 양기웅 엄영선 오원희 오다건 원재천 원준표 유연우 유윤정 윤대웅 윤웅상 이다정 이미숙 이선이 이성원 이성현 이연재 이영환 이용진 이용훈 이은경 이재천이정국 이진영 이진화 이철호 임사라 임유철 장근호 장동진 전명옥 정사명 정성윤 정윤재 조규완 조산새 조수아 조용노 조윤영 조지영 제강호 지연숙 최서린 최치훈 한지민 허 선 황선영 황원희 황유정 황태희 (주)노아종합상사, (주)대덕휴비즈, (주)파라다이스, (주)부원공업, (주)디자인210, 의료법인 오해븐의료재단, 트리코인베스트먼트(주), 재단법인 정암, 고고밴, 일동제약(주) 및 임직원 일동, 한국외국인학교, 디자인스튜디오, 주)네오아이오티, (주)사운드파이브코리아, 고양국제고 보담, 대원 휴라시아, 숭의 휴라시아, 애인, 하나 휴라시아, H.A.S, HATS, Human Acts, Hyehwa Human Asia, K.I.H.A, K.I.S.J, S.A.W, S.C.C.W, Volhumteer, Ms. Rights, 청심휴라시아 Thank you.

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  • Newletter
  • 2019.08.30

[Human Asia Newsletter] August 2019

Human Asia Newsletter August 2019 No.109 ​ BOOK REVIEW _____________________________________ Beijing Coma - Ma Jian (English translation by Flora Drew) On 18 August 2019, US President Donald Trump warned China against carrying out ‘another Tiananmen Square’ on Hong Kong’s growing number of pro-democracy protesters. Ma Jian’s Beijing Coma looks back to these protests which now took place over 30 years ago. Beijing Coma is a timely reminder of the importance of freedom of assembly and expression, of the harrowing damage that can be inflicted when these rights are not respected, and of the need to carry on fighting for and protecting these fundamental human rights. The book alternates between a present day and the volatile weeks after the death of pro-reform Communist general secretary Hu Yaobang in April 1989. The protagonist of the story is Dai Wei, who was shot in the head during the government crackdown against the Tiananmen protesters. Although seemingly comatose, Dai Wei’s mind remains conscious and alert to his surroundings in his mother’s apartment. Trapped in the present, we are taken through Dai Wei’s past: from the letters from his father sentenced to 22 years of labour due to ‘anti-Communist’ activities, to dropping out of school; to attending and becoming politicised at a university in Guangzhou. We learn about Dai Wei’s classmates, love interests, and even the strangers around him: all of whom Dai Wei ultimately witnesses being subjected to horrors and violent ends when the crackdowns escalate. In the present, whilst his former classmates leave their pasts behind them to get rich in a rapidly developing China, Dai Wai himself remains trapped and subjected to abuses: from starvation and sexual abuse, to having his organs trafficked for cash. The author still however stresses that Dai Mei is ‘a strong, resilient person; who remembers’. Only memory, Ma states, can ultimately help people regain the brightness of freedom. This underlying message strikes as prominent even today. Beijing Coma, therefore, can be read as an inspiring and optimistic novel, one with particular value when viewed against the present situations today. FILM REVIEW _____________________________________ 13th - Directed by Ava DuVernay 13th, an American documentary film directed by Ava DuVernay, opens with a hard-hitting statistic. ‘The United States’, states former President Barack Obama, ‘is home to 5% of the world's population but 25% of the world's prisoners’. This is ever the more concerning when we consider that African American citizens are incarcerated at more than 5 times the rate of white Americans. This film takes it name from the 13th amendment of the US Constitution, which officially abolished slavery in 1865. As the film delves through centuries-old history of institutional racism in the US, however, the irony and loopholes of the amendment makes itself clear to the viewer. 13th demonstrates how stigmatisation stemming from history and deliberate blind spots regarding involuntary servitude has resulted in American society systematically criminalising and denouncing its African American citizens as ‘low-status individuals’. The film starts with the period of Reconstruction in the US; when white Southern civilians no longer could use the structural underpinning of slavery to support their economy. The end of slavery led instead to the ‘mythology of black criminality’, intiliased by Southern states criminalising minor offenses, arresting freedmen and forcing them to work when they could not pay fines. After exploring how this deteriorated into the lynchings and racism of the Jim Crow era, DuVernay then moves into the passage of civil rights legislation in the 1960s and the Republican party’s infamous ‘war on drugs’. Mass incarceration of ‘drug addicts’ and ‘criminals’ from the 1970s for political purposes resulted in demonization of minority and poor demographics, fears of minorities by whites, and excessive police brutality against African American and other minority communities. Such history has all accumulated in the police violence and deaths against African Americans ongoing today in the US. Although the tangled, dark history of systematic racism explored in 13th is to an extent unique to the US, this film is a must-watch for anyone with an interest in minority rights. It clearly and convincingly demonstrates that the state is not always fair or impartial: it implements bias and discrimination in ways that might not be immediately apparent from an outside perspective. For those who don’t have time to watch the whole of Netflix’s more recent series When They See Us (on the Central Park Five), 13th is a condensed and fascinating insight on how the past has created our present, and how we can act today for a better future. UPCOMING EVENTS _____________________________________ Closing Ceremony for the 14th Young Human Rights Activists WorkshopInterviews and Announcements for the 2019 Jeongam Global Vision Scholarship Recipients Human Asia Supporters 강문숙 강민승 곽병수 구명진 구자승 구정우 권소미 권오승 김갑유 김고은 김광일 김도형 김동혁 김민서 김민지 김수영 김영자 김우영 김자원 김종엽 김태령 김혁(1) 김혁(2) 김현호 김형근 류성호 류호근 문대원 박범진 박정훈 박창현 박현준 박혜란 배명호 백범석 서창우 서창희 손교명 송영훈 송진원 심재경 양기웅 엄영선 오원희 오다건 원재천 원준표 유연우 유윤정 윤대웅 윤웅상 이다정 이미숙 이선이 이성원 이성현 이연재 이영환 이용진 이용훈 이은경 이재천이정국 이진영 이진화 이철호 임사라 임유철 장근호 장동진 전명옥 정사명 정성윤 정윤재 조규완 조산새 조수아 조용노 조윤영 조지영 제강호 지연숙 최서린 최치훈 한지민 허 선 황선영 황원희 황유정 황태희 (주)노아종합상사, (주)대덕휴비즈, (주)파라다이스, (주)부원공업, (주)디자인210, 의료법인 오해븐의료재단, 트리코인베스트먼트(주), 재단법인 정암, 고고밴, 일동제약(주) 및 임직원 일동, 한국외국인학교, 디자인스튜디오, 주)네오아이오티, (주)사운드파이브코리아, 고양국제고 보담, 대원 휴라시아, 숭의 휴라시아, 애인, 하나 휴라시아, H.A.S, HATS, Human Acts, Hyehwa Human Asia, K.I.H.A, K.I.S.J, S.A.W, S.C.C.W, Volhumteer, Ms. Rights, 청심휴라시아 Thank you.

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  • Newletter
  • 2019.06.28

[Human Asia Newsletter] June 2019

Human Asia Newsletter June 2019 No.108 ​ BOOK REVIEW _____________________________________ ​This Is Your Shelter - Hotaeg Lee, Myungsook Cho June 20th is the World Refugee Day. Refugee is someone who has been forced to flee his or her country because of persecution, war or violence. Refugee has a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group. Due to the fears they face, they do not want to return to their home or are afraid to be protected by their home state. About a year ago, as Yemeni refugees came to Jeju island seeking for asylum, ‘refugee’ is no longer a story of some neighboring country, but a story of ours. Even though a year has passed since the crisis, they still are strangers to us and the glass ceiling exists. The book ‘This Is Your Shelter’ explains the basic concept of refugee and why people flee their homes, as well as includes vivid stories on refugees in Korea. The stories are depicted in their point of view, rather than ours, which is very unique and distinctive. Through this, the author emphasizes that there will be no problems taking place as we ‘thought’ or ‘imagined’ by correcting the misconceptions existing in the Korean society. Refugees, as human beings, are no different than us. Hence, their basic rights such as right to life should be kept, but unfortunately their rights are violated due to the prevalent prejudices and bias toward them. So, it is crucial to change the perspective that people have and in that part, I believe this book can help us to correct misinformation that we have. Also we will be able to understand them better which can lead to endeavors and actions trying to embrace them in our community, by knowing their story deep down and sympathizing with them. FILM REVIEW _____________________________________ Get Out - Directed by Jordan Peele This movie was popular with Koreans for a while. Since there were so many reviews like "I'm Scared", I had only thought of movies as horror thrillers genre. But after watching the movie, I was more interested in the contents rather than genre. The movie ‘Get Out’ starts from the point when an black man, ‘Chris,’ is invited to his white girlfriend, Rose's house. Rose truly loved Chris, but her family members turned out to be demons and extreme racists who kidnap black people and do terrible things. They believed that the intelligence that white people have and with the body of black people have would make the best human beings, so they have long continued bizarre experiments that mixes brains of the two respectively, on black bodies. This, after all, was controlled by white people, both physically and mentally. We need to pay attention to the content and background of the movie. The settings of the movie were not exactly specified, but based on clothes and background of the main characters, it can be said that it is a modern era. This suggests that racial discrimination against black people is less severe than it used to be, but prejudice against them still persists. Also, the movie shows the racist behavior does not take place only at Rose's house but also elsewhere. I could get a glimpse of their lives from trivial routines, such as the main character’s behavior unconsciously conscious of white people or raising his hand right when seeing the police without any wrongdoing. Racism is already an international issue that has long gone beyond the social problems we know. As such, everyone knows racism must be fixed, but ironically, the problem still continues to arise. Korean is becoming a multiracial nation but I am not sure we are responding well to these changes. Because there are still discriminations and prejudices against other races throughout our society. So I think it's time for our society to be more active in its agony to create a society free from prejudice and discrimination. First of all, how about thinking about the prejudices that I had unconsciously? UPCOMING EVENTS _____________________________________ The 2019 6th International Model UN Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review Orientation (7/2)2019 14th Young Human Rights Activists Workshop (7/6~9/7) Human Asia Supporters 강문숙 강민승 곽병수 구명진 구자승 구정우 권소미 권오승 김갑유 김고은 김광일 김도형 김동혁 김민서 김민지 김수영 김영자 김우영 김자원 김종엽 김태령 김혁(1) 김혁(2) 김현호 김형근 류성호 류호근 문대원 박범진 박정훈 박창현 박현준 박혜란 배명호 백범석 서창우 서창희 손교명 송영훈 송진원 심재경 양기웅 엄영선 오원희 오다건 원재천 원준표 유연우 유윤정 윤대웅 윤웅상 이다정 이미숙 이선이 이성원 이성현 이연재 이영환 이용진 이용훈 이은경 이재천이정국 이진영 이진화 이철호 임사라 임유철 장근호 장동진 전명옥 정사명 정성윤 정윤재 조규완 조산새 조수아 조용노 조윤영 조지영 제강호 지연숙 최서린 최치훈 한지민 허 선 황선영 황원희 황유정 황태희 (주)노아종합상사, (주)대덕휴비즈, (주)파라다이스, (주)부원공업, (주)디자인210, 의료법인 오해븐의료재단, 트리코인베스트먼트(주), 재단법인 정암, 고고밴, 일동제약(주) 및 임직원 일동, 한국외국인학교, 디자인스튜디오, 주)네오아이오티, (주)사운드파이브코리아, 고양국제고 보담, 대원 휴라시아, 숭의 휴라시아, 애인, 하나 휴라시아, H.A.S, HATS, Human Acts, Hyehwa Human Asia, K.I.H.A, K.I.S.J, S.A.W, S.C.C.W, Volhumteer, Ms. Rights, 청심휴라시아 Thank you.

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  • Newletter
  • 2019.04.30

[Human Asia Newsletter] April 2019

Human Asia Newsletter April 2019 No.107 ​ BOOK REVIEW _____________________________________ The New Jim Crow - Michelle Alexander “The New Jim Crow” is a book by Michelle Alexander, a civil rights litigator and legal scholar. The book discusses race-related issues specific to African-American males and mass incarceration in the United States. Michelle Alexander argues that despite the old Jim Crow is gone, it does not necessarily mean the end of racial caste. Alexander describes a set of practices and social discourses that serve to maintain African-American people controlled by systems and institutions. The author further examines the mass incarceration phenomenon in recent years. Comparing Jim Crow with mass incarceration, she points out that mass incarceration is a network of laws, policies, customs and institutions that works together to ensure the subordinate status of a group defined by race. Alexander then describes the New Jim Crow as a moment where society have already internalized the stereotypes of African-American men as violent and more likely to commit. That is, today is seen as normal that black parents are missing in their homes because they are in institutions of control. She also stresses American society denies racism when they assume the justice system works. Therefore, she claims that “mass incarceration is colorblind” and that American society does not see the race biased within the institutions of control. Mass incarceration in a country that presumes to avoid racism and even develops the practice of affirmative action to guarantee the progress of minorities, is an invisible tool to maintain the repressive state apparatus working with a race bias. Hence, the new Jim Crow allows to segregate the black community and to obstacle its progress. A community that does not have the same opportunity for its development due to its race, cannot erase the line that define its lower position in a race hierarchy. Ultimately the purpose of the New Jim Crow as the Old Jim Crow is to segregate the marginalized communities in the United States. According to the author, it was clear that the justice system in the U.S. is still not fair, and that collective action must arise to challenge it. FILM REVIEW _____________________________________ Help- Directed by Tate Taylor The film “The Help” is very closely relevant to the untold stories of African-American women and their experiences in service to the white women – part of the narrative of civil rights and segregation in America. During the 60s, the era in which the movie was set, segregation was legal and economic inequalities are heavily limited for black women. Descriptions of historical events of the early activities of the civil rights movement are peppered throughout the movie, as are interactions between the maids and their white employers. Race plays an important role in the film by showing how race is greatly valued in our culture, and that race is a crucial aspect of everyday life. In “The Help”, the film represents black women who labored as domestic servants in white home as loyal and caring in serving them. The characters in the film are socially conditioned to assume certain rights and beliefs about the races, in this case white and black. The white women are brainwashed and pressured to believe that their maids are lower life forms that do not have the same rights or characteristics as themselves. For example, Miss Hillie commented that Minnie needed to use the outside bathroom and the Help need to use their own bathrooms because they carry different diseases from them. More disturbing is that the other women partaking in the social event felt pressured to believe in that idea in order to avoid possible social sanctions. The scenes of the social gatherings demonstrate how our peers influence our thoughts and actions, as we are fearing rejection and social sanctions. Being well-liked in society is more valued than standing up for one’s beliefs because people have the power to take away opportunities. There are many instances that affect other aspects of an individual’s life that are often discouraged in fear of losing a job, safety, or financial security. Overall, “The Help” provides an insightful storyline taking place in the roughness of the simmering racial prejudices of the 1960s. Today, as compared to the 60s, is a racially quieter era, but in a way is still pounding its way through. Therefore, a movie like “The Help” speaks to the public now as people will share a greater understanding of the past in a better way rather than being ignorant and blind. UPCOMING EVENTS _____________________________________ - 2019 4th Conference for Human Rights Leaders of the Next Generation(5/3)- Application opens for 2019 International Model UPR(5/20) Human Asia Supporters 강문숙 강민승 곽병수 구명진 구자승 구정우 권소미 권오승 김갑유 김고은 김광일 김도형 김동혁 김민서 김민지 김수영 김영자 김우영 김자원 김종엽 김태령 김혁(1) 김혁(2) 김현호 김형근 류성호 류호근 문대원 박범진 박정훈 박창현 박현준 박혜란 배명호 백범석 서창우 서창희 손교명 송영훈 송진원 심재경 양기웅 엄영선 오원희 오다건 원재천 원준표 유연우 유윤정 윤대웅 윤웅상 이다정 이미숙 이선이 이성원 이성현 이연재 이영환 이용진 이용훈 이은경 이재천이정국 이진영 이진화 이철호 임사라 임유철 장근호 장동진 전명옥 정사명 정성윤 정윤재 조규완 조산새 조수아 조용노 조윤영 조지영 제강호 지연숙 최서린 최치훈 한지민 허 선 황선영 황원희 황유정 황태희 (주)노아종합상사, (주)대덕휴비즈, (주)파라다이스, (주)부원공업, (주)디자인210, 의료법인 오해븐의료재단, 트리코인베스트먼트(주), 재단법인 정암, 고고밴, 일동제약(주) 및 임직원 일동, 한국외국인학교, 디자인스튜디오, 주)네오아이오티, (주)사운드파이브코리아, 고양국제고 보담, 대원 휴라시아, 숭의 휴라시아, 애인, 하나 휴라시아, H.A.S, HATS, Human Acts, Hyehwa Human Asia, K.I.H.A, K.I.S.J, S.A.W, S.C.C.W, Volhumteer, Ms. Rights, 청심휴라시아 Thank you.

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