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The 2020 4th Human Rights English Essay Competition Presentation Ceremony

  • 2020.09.29
  • Admin

The 2020 4th Human Rights English Essay Competition Presentation Ceremony



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Presentation 1: Second Runner Up
'Racism and Xenophobia in the age of COVID-19: crafting a global response to counter the rise in discrimination' - TaeHwan Alexander Kim

 On Monday 28 September, Human Asia hosted the Presentation Ceremony for the 2020 4th Human Rights English Essay Competition. The ceremony was held virtually via Zoom, and was attended by participants of the competition, the top three entries, UAEM Korea students, Human Asia, and our guest judges - Daniel Connolly (Assistant Professor, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies) Buhm-Suk Baek (Professor, Kyung-Hee College of International Studies) and Sinhye Ha (External Relations Advisor, Médecins Sans Frontières).

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Presentation 2: First Runner Up
'COVID-19 and Human Rights: A Viral Illness Reveals Societal Ills' - Hyoim Shin

After some words of welcome from Human Asia’s President Changrok Soh, the judges began the event by providing some general feedback on the top ten entries for the competition. Each of the top three entries - TaeHwan Alexander Kim (Second Runner Up) Hyoim Shin (First Runner Up) and Seokhwan Park (Grand Prize Winner) - then gave a presentation on their essay entries. The judges provided more detailed feedback and areas to improve upon for future academic research essays.


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Presentation 3: Grand Prize Winner
'Human Rights and the Equitable Distribution of COVID-19 Vaccines' - Seokhwan Park

Please see the attached file above to read the winning essay:

Human Rights and the Equitable Distribution of COVID-19 Vaccines 
Seokhwan Park 

Abstract: This paper highlights the importance of developing a system for the equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccines. Although the rate of development of COVID-19 vaccines has increased greatly, discussion of how to achieve an equitable distribution of vaccines to ensure everyone’s safety has yet to transpire. Previous studies have evaluated the equity of the distribution of vaccines during the H1N1 pandemic in 2011 and suggested that the inequitable distribution of vaccines poses a risk to the residents of poor regions and widens the gap between the poor and the rich on a global scale. The already active financial race to develop COVID-19 vaccines among wealthy nations generally excludes less wealthy nations from participation in the early stages of vaccine distribution, including price negotiation. Given the high level of medical urgency, nations are likely to prioritize domestic medical needs, leading to nationalism. Therefore, wealthy nations should provide greater political leadership. To do so, the WHO and other international organizations need to place increased political pressure on the most dominant countries. In addition, more flexibility in intellectual property laws and an effective data sharing system can effectively prevent vaccines from becoming monopolized by a few nations. Continuous political negotiations will develop practical solutions, such as tax exemptions and government subsidies for manufacturing companies, that can be applied immediately. 

Thank you again to everyone who took part in the event.